Hekate Speaks About Jesus

The Neoplatonist Porphyry of Tyre (c. AD 234 – c. AD 305) once consulted an oracle of Hekate concerning Jesus. The results he obtained were recorded by a Christian writer but, according to Wikipedia, the other oracles Porphyry obtained from Hekate seem to indicate standard oracular procedure and are probably accurate — except maybe about the consumption of meat, which I honestly don’t care about — and so this oracle was probably recorded accurately as well, especially considering the anti-Christian themes preserved in it.

Quite a while ago I copied and pasted into a text document the oracle below. So sadly I don’t know its English language source. It is repeated with a glaring omission — the actual words of Hekate via Her oracle — in Sorita D’Este’s and David Rankine’s book Hekate: Liminal Rites, p. 118.

Here follows the text of the oracle of Hekate concerning Jesus as well as Porphyry’s interpretation…

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But to some who asked Hekate whether Christ were a God, she replied: “You know the condition of the disembodied immortal soul, and that if it has been severed from wisdom it always errs. The soul you refer to is that of a man foremost in piety: they worship it because they mistake the truth.” To this so-called oracular response he [Porphyry] adds the following words of his own: “Of this very pious man, then, Hekate said that the soul, like the souls of other good men, was after death dowered with immortality, and that the Christians through ignorance worship it. And to those who ask why he was condemned to die, the oracle of the goddess replied, The body, indeed, is always exposed to torments, but the souls of the pious abide in heaven. And the soul you inquire about has been the fatal cause of error to other souls which were not fated to receive the gifts of the gods, and to have the knowledge of immortal Zeus. Such souls are therefore hated by the gods; for they who were fated not to receive the gifts of the gods, and not to know God, were fated to be involved in error by means of him you speak of. He himself, however, was good, and heaven has been opened to him as to other good men. You are not, then, to speak evil of him, but to pity the folly of men: and through him men’s danger is imminent.

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