The Litany of Satan

The Lightbringer

My personal belief is that Satan is simply the non-benign face of Lucifer-Satan. The one he shows to the unworthy. I adopted this belief from Quimbanda. When I read the following poem, it seems to me to be about Lucifer.

It’s my favorite translation as it’s the most literally rendered from Charles Baudelaire’s French that I can find. I found it on the Web years ago and it’s still there so I assume it’s in the public domain. Hope you enjoy it.

The key to joy is disobedience … There is no guilt and there is no shame.

Much love, Rachel Izabella

~~~~~~~~~

The Litany of Satan

O you, the wisest and fairest of the Angels,
God betrayed by destiny and deprived of praise,

O Satan, take pity on my long misery!

O Prince of Exile, you who have been wronged
And who vanquished always rise up again more strong,

O Satan, take pity on my long misery!

You who know all, great king of hidden things,
The familiar healer of human sufferings,

O Satan, take pity on my long misery!

You who teach through love the taste for Heaven
To the cursed pariah, even to the leper,

O Satan, take pity on my long misery!

You who of Death, your mistress old and strong,
Have begotten Hope, — a charming madcap!

O Satan, take pity on my long misery!

You who give the outlaw that calm and haughty look
That damns the whole multitude around his scaffold.

O Satan, take pity on my long misery!

You who know in what nooks of the miserly earth
A jealous God has hidden precious stones,

O Satan, take pity on my long misery!

You whose clear eye sees the deep arsenals
Where the tribe of metals sleeps in its tomb,

O Satan, take pity on my long misery!

You whose broad hand conceals the precipice
From the sleep-walker wandering on the building’s ledge,

O Satan, take pity on my long misery!

You who soften magically the old bones
Of belated drunkards trampled by the horses,

O Satan, take pity on my long misery!

You who to console frail mankind in its sufferings
Taught us to mix sulphur and saltpeter,

O Satan, take pity on my long misery!

You who put your mark, O subtle accomplice,
Upon the brow of Croesus, base and pitiless,

O Satan, take pity on my long misery!

You who put in the eyes and hearts of prostitutes
The cult of sores and the love of rags and tatters,

O Satan, take pity on my long misery!

Staff of those in exile, lamp of the inventor,
Confessor of the hanged and of conspirators,

O Satan, take pity on my long misery!

Adopted father of those whom in black rage
— God the Father drove from the earthly paradise,

O Satan, take pity on my long misery!

Prayer

Glory and praise to you, O Satan, in the heights
Of Heaven where you reigned and in the depths
Of Hell where vanquished you dream in silence!
Grant that my soul may someday repose near to you
Under the Tree of Knowledge, when, over your brow,
Its branches will spread like a new Temple!

— William Aggeler, The Flowers of Evil (Fresno, CA: Academy Library Guild, 1954)

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10 thoughts on “The Litany of Satan

  1. Amazing poem – thanks for posting. It has to me – probably ill educated – eye, gnostic overtones as well. 🙂

    • Rachel Izabella says:

      I’m glad you liked it. And I don’t think you’re mistaken at all about the Gnostic implications of the poem. Much love, Rachel Izabella

  2. Cassie says:

    Perhaps I am being over optimistic, but I do think more people are beginning to see Satan/Lucifer with new eyes rinsed clean of prejudice and deception.

    • Rachel Izabella says:

      More people, yes, I don’t doubt it. I think our society however, at least in the US, is sadly far from generally accepting Satanism/Luciferianism. Ditto for polytheism, the occult, being trans, etc. Much love, Rachel Izabella

  3. Robert Mitchell says:

    Well I’ll be! Can’t believe I’ve never heard of this before! And I thought I was fairly well read. Now I want to read the entire “Les Fleurs du mal.” If you like this you may also like Stéphane Mallarmé.

  4. Lazola says:

    I want to sell my soul

    • Rachel Izabella says:

      Well, good luck with that. I’ve met Lucifer, and I know he’s a man (so to speak) of wealth and taste. Ask yourself, what need has he of your soul? And is buying souls an activity that demonstrates good taste? I wouldn’t advise mocking him with such assertions.

      Without rancor and in all sincerity, Rachel Izabella

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